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What is Delayed Cord Clamping?

Sometimes, medical interventions are required during labor and delivery. Delayed cord clamping is one of the interventions alongside epidurals and emergency C-sections and simply means that the umbilical cord is rather clamped and cut one to three minutes after delivery as opposed to immediately.

There are indications that delayed cord clamping makes it possible for blood to continue to flow from the placenta to the newborn after delivery. Shreds of evidence from studies also suggest that this blood that flows to the placenta is very beneficial to newborn babies, especially to preterm babies.  Scientists have actually linked delayed cord clamping to increased iron and hemoglobin which are essential in reducing the risk of anemia in children. Of course, delayed cord clamping can also improve the circulation of blood in premature babies, thereby reducing the need for a blood transfusion. In addition, delayed cord clamping helps in reducing the risk of internal bleeding in the brain.

After delivery, the cord is normally clamped in two places: near the baby’s belly button as well as farther down the cord. Meanwhile, the cut is always made between these clamps by your partner, doctor, or midwife. Most medical experts however recommend that the baby be held near or at the level of the placenta before clamping as it increases blood flow. On the flip side it is believed that if the baby is raised above the placenta, gravity can instead pull back blood into the placenta, thereby depriving the baby of blood flow.

Even though the delayed length has not yet been standardized, clamping can be delayed if it happens more than 30 seconds after delivery.

Delayed cord clamping may be associated with jaundice, but its benefits still outweigh the risk since jaundice can easily be treated through phototherapy. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has made it clear that delayed cord clamping does not add the risk of excessive maternal blood loss or postpartum hemorrhage.1

 

Reference:

  1. Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping After Birth. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG) website. https://www.acog.org/clinical/clinical-guidance/committee-opinion/articles/2020/12/delayed-umbilical-cord-clamping-after-birth. Last accessed April 22, 2021.

Why I Can’t Feel My Let-down When Nursing

Let-down is a natural reaction that occurs during breastfeeding. You typically experience this feeling when your baby latches onto your breast and start sucking. The let-down reflex is associated with hormones such as prolactin and oxytocin which are responsible for making more and releasing breast milk respectively.

The major signs and symptoms of let-down include tingling or warm sensation in your breasts when your baby is latching. Your breasts may also leak and you may notice milk dripping out of your baby’s mouth. In the early weeks following childbirth, let-down can be felt as menstrual-like cramps in the uterus. Above all, your baby’s weight gain is also an indication of having a good breast milk production.

While most women experience let-down, others may not feel their milk letting down. Some women may also experience it earlier after childbirth, but lesser as time goes by. Well, if you do not experience let-downs at all, it doesn’t necessarily mean something serious is wrong with you. There is truly nothing to worry about as long as your child is getting enough breast milk and growing well.

That said, not feeling let down may be an indication that your breast milk is low. If this is the case, you may consider consulting with a lactation expert to help you in boosting breast milk production. A combination of lifestyle or stress factors can also cause slow or delayed let-down. For example, smoking, alcohol and caffeine can result in low breast milk. Cold temperatures, stress and fatigue may also result in slow or difficult let-down.

Unfortunately, your baby is the one to bear the brunt of a slow or difficult led-down as it can really be frustrating to a hungry baby. Here are some tips to stimulate milk let-down:

 

  • Taking a warm bath before breastfeeding or pumping milk;
  • Placing a warm cloth on your breast with massage before breastfeeding or pumping;
  • Staying relaxed and stress-free throughout your nursing phase;
  • Gently massaging your breast before breastfeeding or pumping;
  • Having skin-to-skin contact with your baby prior nursing;
  • Drinking enough fluids, notably water and natural juices to keep you hydrated;
  • Limiting your intake of coffee and soda;
  • Avoid drinking alcohol;
  • Looking or thinking about your baby while you are pumping milk
  •  Avoid smoking.

Generally, feeling let-down will give you an indicator that your body is producing breastmilk. However, although you are feeling let down and feeding your baby well, you should consult lactation expert if you noticed your baby is not gaining weight well.

What is the APGAR Score?

APGAR is a quick test that is usually performed on newborns when they are 1 and 5 minutes. old. These tests are often performed to assess the baby’s overall health condition. The test performed one minute after birth determines how well the baby tolerated labor whereas that performed at 5 minutes indicates how well the baby is thriving out of the womb.

The APGAR test particularly focuses on five major categories, including breathing effort (respiration), heart rate (pulse), muscle tone (activity), reflexes and skin color. For each category, the baby can score from zero (0) to two (2) points, depending on his condition. However, the overall APGAR test is ten (10), given that each category gives a maximum of two points.

The test is usually done by a doctor, nurse or midwife and points are awarded as follows:

Breathing/Respiratory

  •         Zero (0) point if the baby is not breathing at all
  •         One (1) point if the breathing is slow, irregular, and coupled with weak crying.
  •         Two (2) points if the infant cries well.

Heart rate / Pulse

  •         Zero (0) point if there is no heart activity
  •         One (1) point if the heartbeat is less than 100 per minute
  •         Two (2) points if the heartbeat is greater than 100 per minute.

Muscle tone / Activity

  •         Zero (0) point for loose and floppy muscles
  •         One (1) point for loose muscle activity
  •         Two points (2) for active movement.

Reflexes

  •         Zero (0) point if there is no reaction to simulation
  •         One point (1) if there is some facial movement and reaction to stimulation
  •         Two (2) points if there is crying, coughing, sneezing and ability to react to stimulation.

Skin Color

  •         Zero (0) point if the baby’s skin is pale, blue or bluish-grey
  •         One (1) point if the baby’s color is pink with blue extremities
  •         Two (2) points if the baby’s skin is pink all over.

An APGAR score of 7 is reassuring while a score of between 4 and 6 is considered moderately abnormal. Scores of 0 to 5 are extremely concerning and such babies often need interventions such as oxygen or could be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit.

Although the APGAR score determines how well the baby is thriving immediately after birth, it doesn’t reflect the baby’s overall health in the long run.

5 Alternative Birthing Methods You May Consider

With advancements in medical technology, childbirth has become a lot safer for both the mother and the baby. So far, most hospitals have responded to the changes in trends and that explains why women can now choose the best birthing method that is safe and convenient for them. Although it is granted that an easy and perfectly executed birth plan is ideal, there can still be sudden twists and turns, which can sometimes necessitate alternative delivery methods. Besides, women also have the rights to opt for the best birthing method as long as it is affordable and also safe for them and for their babies. Now, let’s look at the five alternative birthing methods you may want to consider:

1) Vaginal birth

This birthing method is highly recommended for pregnant women who do not have any complications nor are at risk of developing one. Vaginal birth actually involves three stages which include labor, pushing the baby through the vagina, and finally delivering the placenta. Vaginal birth is not only safe, but it also associated with benefits such as lower rates of infections, quicker delivery, and shorter hospital stays. More so, babies born vaginally have a lower risk of developing respiratory problems.

 

2) Cesarean delivery (C-section)

A cesarean section is a birth method that involves the delivery of a baby through a surgical incision in the abdomen and uterus of the mother. Some C-sections are emergency as a result of unforeseen complications that may arise during vaginal delivery, whereas others are scheduled in advance. Some of the circumstances that can necessitate a C-Section include multiple babies, a baby who weighs more than normal, a baby in a breech or transverse position, or placenta trivia. With innovations in medicine, C-sections are currently very safe.

3) Water birth

Water birth is another alternative birthing method. It is simply vaginal delivery that takes place in a waist-deep bathtub of water or in a Jacuzzi.  A water birth comes with a relaxing feeling and also reduces pain considerably such that there is no need for an epidural. Water birth is safe for the mother and also poses no risk to the baby whose lungs remain collapsed until he or she is removed from the water.

4) Hypnobirthing

Hypnobirthing involves training pregnant women to achieve complete relaxation right from labor until when the placenta is delivered. This method of birth involves courses alongside an instructor who teaches the mother-to-be self-hypnosis exercises that are geared towards eliminating the pain caused by labor. Through this method, mothers-to-be can easily stay focused and in control of the entire birthing process.

5) Home birth

This is a birthing method where mothers-to-be put to birth in the comforts of their homes. Even though home birth is safe, the American Pregnancy Association has excluded some groups of women from giving birth at home including the women who are suffering from certain health conditions like diabetes and chronic high blood.1 Women who are at risk of preterm labor or have experienced it in the past are also advised not to opt for a home birth. More so, you should not opt for a home birth if your partner is not fully in support of the idea.

Always discuss with your doctor before you make a decision on the birth plan.

 

Reference:

1) Home births. The American Pregnancy Organization Website. https://americanpregnancy.org/healthy-pregnancy/labor-and-birth/home-birth-652/. Last accessed April 22, 2021.

Caffeine During Pregnancy

Cаffеіnе is a drug found in thіngѕ lіkе coffee, tea, ѕоdа, сhосоlаtе аnd ѕоmе energy drіnkѕ and mеdісіnеѕ. It’ѕ a ѕtіmulаnt, whісh mеаnѕ іt can kеер you awake.

 

Hоw dоеѕ caffeine affect уоu and your baby during рrеgnаnсу?

Caffeine ѕlіghtlу increases your blооd рrеѕѕurе аnd hеаrt rаtе, аnd thе amount оf urіnе уоur body mаkеѕ. Cаffеіnе mау cause уоu tо feel jіttеrу, hаvе іndіgеѕtіоn оr have trouble sleeping. During рrеgnаnсу, уоu may bе especially sensitive to саffеіnе because it mау tаkе you longer to сlеаr it from уоur bоdу thаn іf уоu wеrеn’t pregnant.  It mау аlѕо mаkе уоu fееl nauseous or lіghthеаdеd.

When уоu hаvе caffeine during рrеgnаnсу, іt раѕѕеѕ through the placenta tо your baby. Thе рlасеntа grоwѕ іn уоur uterus (wоmb) and ѕuррlіеѕ the bаbу wіth fооd аnd oxygen through the umbilical соrd.

Yоu mау have hеаrd thаt tоо muсh саffеіnе саn саuѕе mіѕсаrrіаgе (when a bаbу dіеѕ іn thе wоmb bеfоrе 20 wееkѕ оf рrеgnаnсу), preterm birth (bіrth thаt happens bеfоrе 37 weeks оf рrеgnаnсу іѕ соmрlеtеd) or lоw birth wеіght (whеn уоur baby іѕ born wеіghіng lеѕѕ thаn 5 роundѕ, 8 ounces). Some ѕtudіеѕ say thіѕ іѕ true, аnd оthеrѕ dоn’t.

It’ѕ bеѕt tо lіmіt thе аmоunt уоu get tо 200 mіllіgrаmѕ each dау. This іѕ about thе аmоunt in 1½ 8-ounce cups оf coffee or оnе 12-оunсе cup оf соffее.  Bе ѕurе tо сhесk the ѕіzе оf your сuр to knоw how muсh саffеіnе уоu’rе gеttіng.

If уоu are pregnant or breastfeeding, consuming uр to 200mg a day іѕ safe for уоur baby.

The аррrоxіmаtе аmоuntѕ of саffеіnе found іn fооd аnd drіnkѕ are:

  • 1 сuр оf instant соffее: 60mg
  • 1 ѕhоt оf espresso coffee: 100mg
  • 1 сuр оf рlungеr соffее: 80mg
  • 1 сuр of tеа: 30mg
  • 375ml саn оf соlа: 49mg
  • 250ml саn оf еnеrgу drіnk: 80mg
  • 100g bаr оf mіlk chocolate: 20mg

 

Decaffeinated drinks usually соntаіn little оr nо саffеіnе. However, enеrgу drіnkѕ аrе nоt recommended durіng рrеgnаnсу аѕ it mау contain high lеvеlѕ of саffеіnе, аnd other ingredients not rесоmmеndеd fоr pregnant wоmеn.

 

Cаffеіnе іn раіnkіllеrѕ

Sоmе раіnkіllеrѕ іnсludе саffеіnе, including some tуреѕ оf раrасеtаmоl. Tablets that hаvе соmbіnеd paracetamol and саffеіnе аrе not recommended. Thе раtіеnt іnfоrmаtіоn leaflet wіll tеll уоu hоw muсh paracetamol and саffеіnе аrе іn еасh tаblеt. Fіnd out mоrе about раіnkіllеrѕ аnd рrеgnаnсу.

 

Caffeine and breastfeeding

The Amеrісаn Aсаdеmу of Pеdіаtrісѕ (AAP) says it’s ѕаfе fоr brеаѕtfееdіng mоmѕ to hаvе caffeine.1 A ѕmаll аmоunt оf саffеіnе dоеѕ get іntо brеаѕt mіlk, ѕо lіmіt саffеіnе іf уоu’rе breastfeeding. Brеаѕtfеd babies оf women whо drіnk more thаn 2 to 3 cups of соffее a day mау bесоmе more awake and fuѕѕу.  Yоu mау want to drіnk lеѕѕ саffеіnе іf уоur bаbу wаѕ born preterm or nеwbоrn because ѕhе may dіgеѕt саffеіnе mоrе ѕlоwlу.

Finally, always tаlk tо уоur midwife, рhаrmасіѕt оr hеаlthсаrе provider before tаkіng аnу medicines during рrеgnаnсу.

 

Reference:

1) Breastfeeding and Caffeine. Kellymom Website. https://kellymom.com/bf/can-i-breastfeed/lifestyle/caffeine/.  Last accessed December 15, 2021.

Breast Pain During Pregnancy

Breast pain can be normal during pregnancy. It’s one of those numerous changes a woman’s body goes through when she is pregnant. Hormonal changes are the leading causes of breast pain in pregnant women. The intensity of breast pain during pregnancy varies from one woman to another. You may feel it in one or both breasts, at a specific spot or all over, or moving towards your underarm. Breast pain may also be permanent or intermittent – coming and going away at intervals.

Breast pain can happen at any time during pregnancy but it’s most common during the first trimester as a result of sudden hormonal changes. This assertion can be backed by the fact that immediately after conception, your body starts preparing for breastfeeding by releasing large quantities of pregnancy hormones, including progesterone, estrogen and prolactin. These hormones cause additional blood flow to the chest, thereby resulting in bigger milk ducts, as well as extra fluids, tissue, and fat which could all cause breast pain.

During the first week of pregnancy, most women experience sensitive breasts which makes sex play and exercising difficult for them. The nipples are particularly very sensitive and tender in the early weeks of pregnancy. It is also not uncommon to experience a tingling sensation in the nipples and areolas during the first trimester. However, as the pregnancy advances, most women start experiencing heaviness and fullness in their breasts.

While breast pain can be normal during pregnancy, it could also be as a result of other conditions such as fibrocystic breast changes, the effects of certain medications and in extremely rare cases, breast cancer. You should therefore consult with your doctor if you start experiencing symptoms such as life-disrupting breast pain, nipple discharge, as well as redness, pus or fever.

Breast pain during pregnancy hardly requires treatment as it often goes away at some point in the pregnancy, a few weeks after childbirth or after lactating. However, it is with utmost importance for you to make lifestyle changes that will ease your breast pain during pregnancy. For example, you should consider ditching lacy underwire bras for full coverage cotton bras with wider shoulder straps. You should also consider wearing sports bras to bed if bed movements are irritating to your tender breasts and nipples.  Adding breast pads to protect your breasts, applying frozen gel or ice packs and taking warm soothing showers can also go a long way to relieve breast pain, swelling and tenderness during pregnancy.

If all these interventions fail, you could discuss with your doctor for medical interventions to ease the pain.

Improvements Seen after Boy Received Own Cord Blood

This is a real story from Ukraine.

3-year-old Maksim was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder after he started to show symptoms of developmental delay. He could neither respond to speech nor concentrate his attention. He could also hardly recognize his own parents.

“In a constant search for new methods of treating autism, in the social media, I came across a video lecture by an obstetrician on the treatment of autism with stem cells,” said Maksim’s mother, Olga.

Using the cord blood Olga stored for Maksim at birth, Maksim was put on a treatment. The day after receiving his own cord blood, some changes in Maksim’s behavior were visible and he even started to babble.

“Within a few weeks, Maksim began to focus his eyes, listen to the speech of others, and try to speak,” Olga recalls.

 

This story is originally published on Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation. https://parentsguidecordblood.org/en/news/maksims-cord-blood-therapy-autism

Last accessed 9 April 2021.

Will Diabetes Return After Delivery?

Pregnancy is a complicated phase that can bring several health conditions. Gestational diabetes is one of those conditions that can be common amongst pregnant women. So, have you been diagnosed with gestational diabetes? If yes, you don’t need to get all nervous and afraid given that an estimated 90% of gestational diabetes resolves on its own after delivery.

That said, your health care providers will check your blood sugar levels several times before you are discharged from the hospital after childbirth. You will then be informed if your gestational diabetes has resolved or if it’s persisting. Of course, medical follow-up is bound to continue with your glucose being checked at about six to eight months after delivering your baby.

Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are at higher risk of developing Type II diabetes. According to statistics about two to three per cent of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes develop type II diabetes after delivery. However, you can reduce the risk of having type II diabetes after gestational diabetes by;

Controlling your weight: Women who fail to control their weight after being diagnosed with gestational diabetes during pregnancy are at a high risk of developing Type II diabetes later in life and gestational diabetes during their next pregnancy. Of course, the best way to control your weight is to eat healthy foods such as vegetables, fruits and grains, as well as to exercise for at least 30 minutes daily.

Breastfeeding your baby: Breastfeeding brings many benefits including strengthening the immune system of babies and protecting them against infections. But that’s not all, breastfeeding also lowers the risks of certain conditions, like breast cancer and Type II diabetes in mothers.

Continue with all your medication and follow-up.
Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes puts you at greater risk of developing type II diabetes. Therefore, you need to continue to follow up with your doctor and perform all your blood tests to be sure you are free from diabetes.

Watch out for the symptoms of Type II diabetes: Above all, you should take charge of your health by watching out for the symptoms of Type II diabetes. Some common symptoms of type II diabetes include frequent urination, fatigue, increased thirst for water and fluids as well as unintentional weight loss. Note that having one or more of these symptoms doesn’t mean you have diabetes, but it’s important to report the symptoms to your healthcare professionals for proper diagnosis.

Overall, gestational diabetes always resolves on its own in about 90 per cent of women after they give birth. But then you need proper medical follow-up after delivering to be sure it hasn’t persisted and if it has, you will be putting on the right treatment plan.

Signs of Preterm Labor

Preterm labor, also known as premature labor occurs when the body starts getting ready for birth before the 37th week of pregnancy. This kind of labor occurs when the uterus tightens, and the cervix begins to open, which may result in premature birth. Babies born before week 37 of pregnancy may not be fully developed; hence they can have life-threatening health problems such as cerebral palsy. Some of the risk factors for preterm labor include a short cervix, short time between pregnancies, pregnancy complications, and lifestyle factors like smoking and overweight.

The following are signs of preterm labor:

• Lower back ache – A dull ache on the lower back is one of the most common warning signs for preterm labour. The pain may be constant or may come and go. More often, it doesn’t go away even if you change positions.
• Flu-like symptoms like vomiting, nausea, or diarrhea, especially after drinking liquids are an indication of preterm labour. If you notice any flu-like symptoms, you must see your doctor immediately.
• Cramps in your lower abdomen that feel like period pain and sometimes may come with diarrhea.
• Frequent contractions of your womb every 10 minutes or more often. These contractions may be painful or painless and may get stronger and more frequent.
• Increased pressure in your pelvis, like your baby is pushing down. Usually, the pressure comes and goes.
• A sudden increase in vaginal discharge or a change in the type of vaginal discharge. It can be watery, mucus, or bloody.
• A gush of fluid from the vagina, which may happen due to ruptured membranes.
• Eyesight problems like blurred or double vision.
• Vaginal spotting or light bleeding.
• A frequent urge to urinate which is primarily caused by pressure on the bladder.
• When the mucous plug at the cervix comes away and out of the vagina.
• Sudden breaking of the waters.
• Swelling of your hands, feet, or face.
• Baby stops moving or moves less

If you experience these signs before the 37th week of your pregnancy, you should see a doctor as quickly as possible. Preterm labor is diagnosed by conducting a cervical exam that entails checking the cervix for changes or a transvaginal ultrasound exam that measures the length of your cervix. A healthcare professional may also test your amniotic fluid to determine whether it’s broken or not.

Stem Cell Therapy Helped My Son

This is a real story from the United States.

13-year-old Colt was born prematurely at 24 weeks of gestation and he was subsequently diagnosed with cerebral palsy and autism. Although Colt was not severely handicapped, he had persistent deficits such as extreme sensitivity to sensory overload.

When the family’s second child was born a few years later, Colt’s parents wanted to enroll him in a Duke University clinical trial with his sibling’s cord blood. Sadly, Colt was too old by then to be accepted into the trial so his parents continued to search for other options.

After learning more about stem cell therapy from a book by Dr. Neil Riordan, Stem Cell Therapy: How Stem Cells are Disrupting Medicine and Transforming Lives: A Rising Tide, Colt’s parents decided to bring him to Panama Stem Cell Institute for intravenous infusions of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from umbilical cord tissue. Colt was 11 by then.

Both Colt’s expressive and receptive language showed a 35% improvement after the first trip. He no longer has the balance or sensory sensitivities issue. He can now ride a bike without training wheels and has gained sense of self-awareness and self-confidence.

This story is originally published on Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation. https://parentsguidecordblood.org/en/news/cord-tissue-msc-helped-my-adolescent-son

Last accessed 9 April 2021.

What is Placenta Delivery?

The placenta is the unique organ that attaches to the top or the side of the wall of the uterus through the umbilical cord. Its major function is to provide nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, but it also performs more functions such as production of estrogen, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and progesterone which is essential for the growth of a healthy fetus.
Placenta delivery is actually the third state of labor. For most births, the placenta is always delivered after the baby has been delivered. When a woman gives birth, delivering her placenta is crucial to her health as failure to do so can result in life-threatening complications such as severe bleeding and other unwanted side effects.

Placenta delivery is significant for both vaginal and cesarean births. When a woman delivers through the vagina, the uterus will continue contracting thereby moving the placenta forward for delivery. At this point, these contractions are as strong as labor contractions and some women may be too overwhelmed by the joy of seeing their babies that they fail to notice when the placenta is being delivered. However, some doctors may press your stomach or instruct you to continue to push so that the placenta can advance forward. Placenta delivery after a vaginal birth is often quick and normally happens within 5 minutes even though it can sometimes take longer.

For women who deliver via C-section, the doctor physically removes the placenta before closing in the incision in the uterus and stomach. After C-section, the doctor always takes measures such as massaging the top of the uterus to encourage it to contract and to begin to shrink. The doctor may further prescribe medicines like Pitocin to help the uterus to contract and become firm.

After delivery, the doctor always takes his time to properly examine the placenta to ensure that all of it has been delivered. The placenta has two sides; the maternal side which has a dark red color and the fetal side which is characterized by shiny and almost translucent color. If the doctor discovers that any side of the placenta is left in the uterus, he is forced to follow some procedures to be assured that it comes out completely.

7 Best Push Gifts For Your Wife

A push gift is a present that a husband gifts his wife for giving birth to their child. The literal meaning is carrying the baby for thirty-eight weeks and then “pushing” the baby out. While the baby itself is a blessing from God, a little pampering gift to your wife is much needed.

A traditional push gift would be jewelry. However, one does not need to limit their push gift to jewelry. Here are some great ideas to consider:

1. Baby Book
This book is the only one a new mom would ever need. Although a baby book sounds like the cheesiest of all presents, your wife is going to love it! It is an amazing feeling when a mom get to document about every milestone in their baby’s life. Get her a beautiful and interactive journal that she can jot down memories in.

2. Chocolate Truffles
Cater to your wife’s sweet tooth and gift her a pack of milk truffles. Truffles taste like cake balls and are full of fun flavors.

3. Essential Oil Diffuser
Essential oils are very calming and soothing. They help you in calming down when you are tired. Essential oil diffusers will allow your wife to choose the scents she prefers and add softness to the ambiance.

4. Diaper bag
Get your wife a stylish mummy bag that don’t look like a diaper bag. Because this is going to be the only bag she can carry around after delivery. Moreover, get one stylish diaper bag that has several zipped pockets, bottle holders, built-in diaper changing mat as well as it comes with adjustable straps that allowing to be hooked on the stroller. Do make sure it is machine washable if it gets dirty too.

5. Accessories
You should get her something that screams ‘proud mom,’ which can either be in the form of studs in her newborn’s birthstone or a locket that says, mom. Accessories are a very popular and elegant push present that she can wear later when her child is grown up.

6. Smart watch
A smart watch is a perfect present that every new mom needs to keep track of time and updates from the mobile. Make sure it is waterproof, though because You don’t want baby pee accidents ruining it.

7. Luxury Tote
All new moms need a carry all bag because they must carry baby stuff around daily. So why not just buy your wife a luxury tote that would be gorgeous and practical? She can keep her own and her baby’s belongings in it without any trouble.