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Health (3-6 yr)

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Symptoms of Asperger’s Syndrome

Asperger’s syndrome is a subset of neurodevelopmental disorder that leads to communication and social interaction difficulties. It also causes restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. Studies show that around 0.02% to 0.03% of the children are affected by Asperger syndrome. It is more prevalent among boys than girls, with the ratio of 8: 1.

It is also one of the disorders on the autism spectrum. Sufferers from Asperger’s may have normal intelligence but they only find communication and socialization difficult. For obvious reasons, it can also be referred to as social pragmatic communication disorder.

Symptoms of Asperger’s Syndrome.

There are numerous symptoms of Asperger’s syndrome that you should look out for in your child if you think they have communication or social difficulties.

Most of these symptoms exhibit very early in their childhood life and gradually develop over time, so they’re not hard to spot. Below are some of the most obvious symptoms of Asperger’s syndrome in children.

  1. Extreme High Level Cognitive and Creative Intelligence

Children diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, tend to have higher intelligence, and creative and cognitive skills than most other kids of the same age group.

You can easily tell because they excel quite effortlessly in fields like fine arts. They also display natural talent and intelligence in brainy tasks like puzzles and mathematics.

  1. Difficulty in Socializing

Not everyone with a high level of cognitive intelligence suffers from Asperger’s syndrome. The most obvious sign of Asperger’s syndrome is difficulties in socializing with others.

They tend to have lesser friends than normal and can find it very tasking to start a one on one conversation with a stranger.

While poor social skills are a strong symptom of Asperger’s syndrome, it doesn’t always mean someone is suffering from Asperger’s syndrome.

  1. Non-Verbal Behaviors

People who suffer from Asperger’s syndrome, show obvious weaknesses in the area of nonverbal communication like hand gestures, facial expressions, and making proper eye contact.

This makes conversations with them unclear, which is a plus for them as they quickly lose interest in interactions with others anyway.

  1. Emotions

People suffering from Asperger’s syndrome, generally find it difficult to communicate using their emotions. For example, they may be unable to alternate between happy and sad emotions appropriately.

Conversations with them can also be completely unemotional and lackluster, which doesn’t worry them much. They’d rather not have any conversation with you anyway.

  1. Fixed Routines

Most people with Asperger’s syndrome have a fixed routine of performing daily activities, like a set timetable for day-to-day living.

For example, they may brush, eat, sleep, and perform other daily activities strictly based on their daily routine and may get angry or sad if there is a disruption.

Do consult with your family paediatrician if you are suspecting your child may have Asperger’s syndrome. Ealy intervention and therapy can help to relieve the symptoms and improve the quality of life.

Reference:

1) Roy M, Dillo W, Emrich HM, Ohlmeier MD. Asperger’s syndrome in adulthood. Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2009;106(5):59-64.

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